My Blog

Posts for: December, 2020

By Anderson Dental
December 30, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dental Bridge  

Missing teeth create gaps that can be unsightly and embarrassing. They can also irritate the mouth, unease in your bite while increasing mental and emotional distress. At Anderson Dental, our dentist may recommend a dental bridge to restore your smile, ability to speak and chew, as well as prevent remaining teeth from shifting out of place. These cosmetic restorations will not only benefit your appearance, but they'll give your oral health an additional boost. Please schedule a consultation with Dr. Jon Anderson, Dr. Brad Anderson, or Dr. Breding in our Fargo, ND, office today to get started.

What Is a Dental Bridge?

A dental bridge comes in different types. At Anderson Dental, our dentist will determine the kind that's best for your particular situation after performing an oral examination and taking X-rays. A dental bridge is a fixed artificial tooth that's supported by two crowns on each side to bridge the gap between one or more missing teeth. It's also considered an alternative to dental implants.

Benefits of a Dental Bridge

One or multiple teeth can devastate self-esteem and make you self-conscious about how others perceive you. One of the benefits of a dental bridge is that the procedure is non-surgical and involves minimal recovery time. They can also last a long time with proper at-home care and annual cleanings in our Fargo, ND, office. A dental bridge is also safe, comfortable, and has a durable reputation. Another advantage is that they prevent further oral problems from developing.

If you're tired of frowning, missing out on your favorite foods, and looking for a solution, consider treatment. You may be a candidate for a dental bridge, and Dr. Jon Anderson or Dr. Brad Anderson will confirm this during your initial visit.

For more information about other services provided at Anderson Dental, visit our website or call (701) 232-1368 for an appointment in our Fargo, ND, office.


TwoMajorCausesforImplantFailureandHowYouCanPreventThem

Dental implants are a reliable way to replace teeth. More than 95% of implants survive ten years after their installation, and many of these could conceivably continue for decades.

But that still leaves a tiny few that don't reach the ten-year mark. Some fail early because the implant didn't integrate fully with the bone to create a durable hold. But others fail later—usually for one of two major causes.

Some failures occur due to over-stressing of the implant from abnormally high biting forces, usually because of teeth grinding. People who have this involuntary habit generate excessive force as they grind their teeth, which can damage implants (as well as natural teeth). To reduce this force, a patient's dentist can fit them with a biteguard they wear in the mouth to prevent teeth from making solid contact with each other during a grinding episode.

Fortunately, teeth grinding isn't that prevalent among adults—but that can't be said about the other major cause for implant failure: periodontal (gum) disease. This is a bacterial infection caused by dental plaque, a thin, bacterial film that accumulates on teeth. The implant itself isn't affected by the infection, but the gums and underlying bone supporting the implant can be.

Implants are most in peril from a form of gum disease called Peri-implantitis, which spreads deeper into the gum tissues around implants faster than infections around natural teeth. That's because implants lack the gum attachment of real teeth, which supply a collagen barrier that slows the spread of infection. Peri-implantitis can quickly infect the supporting bone and eventually weaken its connection with the implant.

Because of its aggressiveness and speed, we must diagnose and treat peri-implantitis as soon as possible to limit any damage to the support structures around an implant. If you notice any swollen, reddened or bleeding gums, you should call your dentist as soon as possible for an examination.

And in light of this potential danger to your implants, you should also strive to prevent gum disease through daily oral hygiene. Brushing and flossing your teeth, including around your implants, removes harmful plaque buildup. This daily habit and regular dental cleanings will help you avoid a costly gum infection and ensure your implants are there for years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: A Tooth-Replacement Method That Rarely Fails.”


By Anderson Dental
December 16, 2020
Category: Oral Health

Your dentists in Fargo, North Dakota can help you keep your teeth white

Did you know you can do a lot at home to keep your smile white? It’s true! In fact, just a few simple tricks and tips can help you keep your smile looking white, bright, and beautiful. Your dentist can help too. Dr. Jon Anderson and Dr. Brad Anderson at Anderson Dental in Fargo, North Dakota offer professional teeth whitening treatments, so you can enjoy a white smile.

One of the main culprits of stains on your teeth is tobacco use. Whether it’s smoking cigarettes, pipes, or cigars, or even chewing tobacco, using tobacco products will lead to a dark, stained smile. The best advice is to quit using tobacco products. They are hard on your teeth and deadly to your body.

Next, try limiting your intake of coffee, tea, and red wine. If you continue to drink these beverages, try to brush your teeth afterward to limit the amount of pigment left on your teeth. You can also switch to white wine instead of red. At the very least, try to rinse your mouth out after drinking these beverages to limit the stains left behind. You can also try drinking through a straw, to keep the liquid off of your teeth.

Highly pigmented foods can also cause stains on your teeth. Healthy foods like blueberries and blackberries can make your teeth dark. Tomato sauce is another food that can cause yellowish stains on your teeth. Again, try to brush or at least rinse your mouth out after eating foods with a high amount of pigment.

It's natural to get stains on your teeth. It’s also natural for your smile to look yellow as you get older. That’s because as you age, your enamel becomes thinner, allowing you to see the layer underneath, called dentin. This dentin layer is naturally yellow, so the more dentin you can see, the yellower your teeth will look.

Your dentist can help you regain your white smile with professional teeth whitening treatment. At Anderson Dental, they offer two highly effective methods to whiten your teeth:

  • An in-office treatment, which is the quickest way to a bright smile, because it takes only about an hour.
  • A take-home treatment, which is a kit containing everything you need to whiten at home.

To find out more about professional teeth whitening and other cosmetic dentistry services, call Dr. Jon Anderson and Dr. Brad Anderson of Anderson Dental in Fargo, North Dakota at (701) 232-1368. Call now, and get started on a beautiful white smile today!


KeepYourChildsFluorideIntakeataSafebutEffectiveLevel

Fluoride is an important part of your child's dental development. But if children take in too much of this important mineral, they could experience enamel fluorosis, a condition in which teeth become discolored with dark streaking or mottling.

That's why it's important to keep fluoride levels within safe bounds, especially for children under the age of 9. To do that, here's a look at the most common sources for fluoride your child may take in and how you can moderate them.

Toothpaste. Fluoridated toothpaste is an effective way for your child to receive the benefits of fluoride. But to make sure they're not getting too much, apply only a smear of toothpaste to the brush for infants. When they get a little older you can increase that to a pea-sized amount on the end of the brush. You should also train your child not to swallow toothpaste.

Drinking water. Most water systems add tiny amounts of fluoride to drinking water. To find out how much your water provider adds visit “My Water's Fluoride” (//nccd.cdc.gov/doh_mwf/Default/Default.aspx) online. If it's more than the government's recommendation of 0.70 parts of fluoride per million parts of water, you may want ask your dentist if you should limit your child's consumption of fluoridated drinking water.

Infant formula. Many parents choose bottle-feeding their baby with infant formula rather than breastfeed. If you use the powdered form and mix it with tap water that's fluoridated, your baby could be ingesting more of the mineral. If breastfeeding isn't an option, try using the premixed formula, which normally contains lower levels of fluoride. If you use powdered formula, mix it with bottled water labeled “de-ionized,” “purified,” “demineralized” or “distilled.”

It might seem like the better strategy for preventing fluorosis is to avoid fluoride altogether. But that can increase the risk of tooth decay, a far more destructive outcome for your child's teeth than the appearance problems caused by fluorosis. The better way is to consult with your dentist on keeping your child's intake within recognized limits to safely receive fluoride's benefits of stronger, healthier teeth.

If you would like more information on fluoride and your baby's dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Development and Infant Formula.”


HowYouTooCouldHaveLindseyVonnsViralVideoSmileMakeover

Instagram, America's humongous digital photo and video album, is chock-full of the silly, mundane, and poignant moments of people's everyday lives. That includes celebrities: Tom Hanks buying a used car; Ryan Reynolds sporting tiny sunglasses; Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran taking a hike. And then there's former Olympic alpine skier, Lindsey Vonn—posting a video of her recent dental visit.

Winner of several World Cup competitions and the first woman to gain the gold for downhill racing at the 2010 Winter Olympics, Vonn broke her two front teeth during a—you guessed it—skiing competition a few years ago. This past September, she went to the dentist to update her restoration and gave her followers a fascinating firsthand look at dental bonding, a technique for repairing a chipped or broken tooth.

Although dental bonding has been around for decades, it's taken a leap forward in the last few years because of improvements in bonding material. A mixture of plastic and glass components, composite resins can produce a strong and durable result when bonded to teeth. To begin the technique, the tooth's surface is prepared so that the composite resin can better adhere. Along with an adhesive agent, the bonding material is applied as a paste, which makes it easier to shape and sculpt for the most realistic look. This is usually done layer by layer, with each individual layer hardened with a curing light.

The technique allows us not only to achieve the right tooth shape, but also to incorporate your natural tooth color. We can tint the composite resin as we work so that your restored tooth blends seamlessly with the rest of your natural teeth. The result: A “new” tooth that's both beautiful and natural-looking.

What's more, dental bonding is more affordable than veneers or crowns and can often be done in a single visit. You will, however, need to exercise care with your new restoration. Although highly durable, it can be damaged if you bite into something hard. You'll also need to watch foods and beverages like tea or coffee that can stain the dental material.

Even so, we can help you regain the smile you once had before you took your teeth skiing—Lindsey Vonn-style—or whatever you were doing that resulted in a “whoopsie.” All it takes is a call for an appointment to start you on the path to a more attractive smile.

If you would like more information about cosmetic dental enhancements, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth With Composite Resin.”