My Blog

Posts for: June, 2020

By Anderson Dental
June 29, 2020
Category: Oral Health
NBAPlayersInjuryPointsOutNeedforMouthguards

Basketball isn't a contact sport—right? Maybe once upon a time that was true… but today, not so much. Just ask New York Knicks point guard Dennis Smith Jr. While scrambling for a loose ball in a recent game, Smith's mouth took a hit from an opposing player's elbow—and he came up missing a big part of his front tooth. It's a type of injury that has become common in this fast-paced game.

Research shows that when it comes to dental damage, basketball is a leader in the field. In fact, one study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) found that intercollegiate athletes who play basketball suffered a rate of dental injuries several times higher than those who played baseball, volleyball or track—even football!

Part of the problem is the nature of the game: With ten fast-moving players competing for space on a small court, collisions are bound to occur. Yet football requires even closer and more aggressive contact. Why don't football players suffer as many orofacial (mouth and face) injuries?

The answer is protective gear. While football players are generally required to wear helmets and mouth guards, hoopsters are not. And, with a few notable exceptions (like Golden State Warriors player Stephen Curry), most don't—which is an unfortunate choice.

Yes, modern dentistry offers many different options for a great-looking, long lasting tooth restoration or replacement. Based on each individual's situation, it's certainly possible to restore a damaged tooth via cosmetic bonding, veneers, bridgework, crowns, or dental implants. But depending on what's needed, these treatments may involve considerable time and expense. It's better to prevent dental injuries before they happen—and the best way to do that is with a custom-made mouthguard.

Here at the dental office we can provide a high-quality mouthguard that's fabricated from an exact model of your mouth, so it fits perfectly. Custom-made mouthguards offer effective protection against injury and are the most comfortable to wear; that's vital, because if you don't wear a mouthguard, it's not helping. Those "off-the-rack" or "boil-and-bite" mouthguards just can't offer the same level of comfort and protection as one that's designed and made just for you.

Do mouthguards really work? The same JADA study mentioned above found that when basketball players were required to wear mouthguards, the injury rate was cut by more than half! So if you (or your children) love to play basketball—or baseball—or any sport where there's a danger of orofacial injury—a custom-made mouthguard is a good investment in your smile's future.

If you would like more information about custom-made athletic mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”


WhetherBeforeorAfterYourWeddingDayItsAlwaysaGoodTimetoEnhanceYourSmile

Like thousands of other June brides and grooms, your big lifetime moment has finally arrived: your wedding day! It's been a flurry of activity over the last few months to prepare for it, especially with efforts to look your absolute best. And you remembered everything—including your smile, right?

If you did, kudos to you. Your smile is an important part of your unique personality and thus merits its own special attention. If, however, in all the hustle and bustle you weren't able to give it the attention it deserves before the wedding, don't fret. When it comes to your smile, it's never too late to make it the best it can be.

Depending on your dental situation, here are four ways to achieve a more confident and attractive smile.

Teeth Whitening. Yellowed and dull teeth can dim the beauty of your smile. While daily brushing and flossing helps, you can further improve your teeth's brightness with professional teeth whitening. Our bleaching techniques can give you the shade you desire, from naturally subdued to Hollywood dazzling. And with proper maintenance and touch-ups, your brighter smile could last for years.

Veneers. Dental imperfections like chips, heavy staining or slight tooth gaps can detract from an otherwise perfect smile. We can mask those imperfections with veneers, thin layers of porcelain custom-created to match your teeth. Although less expensive and less invasive than some other cosmetic procedures, veneers can have a transformative impact on your appearance.

Restorations. Sometimes a smile may suffer from severely distressed or missing teeth. Depending on what you need, we can restore your teeth—and your smile—with crowns, bridges or dental implants. The third option is the closest we can come to a real tooth, replacing both a missing tooth's crown and root. With an implant, you can have a new tooth that looks and functions like the real thing.

Orthodontics. Properly aligned teeth make for a beautiful smile. If yours aren't as straight as you'd like them to be, consider orthodontics, the original “smile makeover.” Moving teeth where they ought to be improves dental health and function, and can dramatically improve the appearance of a smile. Even if you're well past your teen years, you haven't missed out: As long as you're reasonably healthy, you can gain a straighter smile at any age. However, this improvement needs more time and planning—so don't wait if that's what you want to do!

If you still have time before the wedding, a dental cleaning and polish can do wonders for your smile (and your dental health too). But even if you aren't able to fit in an appointment before the big day, you can still pursue a cleaning or cosmetic procedure after the honeymoon. Any time is the right time to change your smile for the better.

If you would like more information about enhancing your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Cosmetic Dentistry” and “Planning Your Wedding Day Smile.”


HowtoHelpYourChildBeattheOddsforGettingaToothInjury

Half of all children will injure at least one tooth before adulthood. That's why we're joining with other health professionals this June to promote National Safety Month. As dentists, we want to call particular attention to potential dental injuries and what parents and caregivers can do to help their child avoid them.

The source for a dental injury usually depends on a child's age and development level. Younger children learning to walk and run are more apt to fall, and may hit their mouth on hard or sharp surfaces. Later on, most dental injuries tend to come from contact during sports play or other physical activities.

Your prevention strategy should therefore adjust to your child's age and activity level. If you have an infant starting to walk, for example, don't allow them to move around carrying a bottle, cup or other hard object that could be a source of injury if they fall. Also, keep an eye out for hard furniture or sharp-edged surfaces as they toddle around.

If you have a highly mobile toddler, discourage them from climbing and jumping on furniture, tables or other hard surfaces. If feasible, pad these surfaces and sharp edges to minimize the force of impact from a collision.

To prevent sports-related mouth injuries in older children and teens, your primary defense is an athletic mouthguard. Mouthguards cushion and absorb much of the force generated during hard sports contact. They should be worn for any physical activity with a potential risk for mouth injury, including practice sessions and informal play like a pick-up basketball game.

A type of athletic mouthguard known as “boil and bite” is readily available in retail sporting goods stores. After purchase, it is softened in very hot water; the wearer then places it in their mouth and bites down to form a permanent impression. Boil and bite mouthguards offer protection, but they can be bulky and uncomfortable to wear.

For a higher level of protection along with a more accurate and comfortable fit, a custom mouthguard created by a dentist is a more desirable option. These are based on a detailed impression of the wearer's bite, so the fit can't be beat. Both types of mouthguard need upgrading periodically in young wearers to accommodate dental development as they age.

Accidents can happen, but there's much you can do to reduce the likelihood of injury to your child's teeth. Protective measures and equipment—as well as a watchful eye—can go far to help them emerge from these active, early years dentally unscathed.

If you would like more information about dental safety, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children” and “Athletic Mouthguards.”