My Blog

Posts for: December, 2017

By Anderson Dental
December 21, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry   veneers  

The dentists at Anderson Dental in Fargo, ND, know their patients want to have better-looking smiles, but sometimes the cost can be too veneershigh. For that reason Drs. Jon Anderson and Brad Anderson suggest dental veneers.

Veneers are used to resurface an individual's teeth, especially if they're damaged.

Here are some things veneers can help with:

  • Stained teeth or discolored, due to poor hygiene, drinking coffee and tea, smoking, chewing tobacco or even antibiotics containing tetracycline.
  • Mishappened teeth, which includes: crooked, worn or chipped teeth, irregularly shaped teeth, uneven surfaces and uneven spacing, like overcrowdedness.

When you come into the Fargo office, your doctor will examine your teeth and assess whether veneers are right for you. If they are, then any underlying issues, like cavities, will need to be resolved first. Your dentist will remove some enamel from the surface of your teeth, then a model of your teeth will be sent to a lab where a custom set of veneers matching the color of your teeth will be made for you.

When your veneers finally arrive, your dentist will then cement the veneers. Because your dentist removes some enamel, which is an irreversible process, and because veneers are made out of thin porcelain, you won't feel like your teeth are protruding. On the contrary, they will feel smooth, even and properly aligned with the rest of your teeth.

In order to take proper care of your veneers, you need to brush twice a day and floss at least once before bed. It's important to prevent the buildup of plaque which may result in cavities and other serious issues.

For more information on veneers, contact your dentists in Fargo, ND, by calling 701-232-1368. Drs. Jon Anderson and Brad Anderson will be more than happy to help you with your dental needs!


CompositeResinCouldTransformYourToothsAppearanceinJustoneVisit

You’ve suddenly noticed one of your teeth looks and feels uneven, and it may even appear chipped. To make matters worse it’s right in front in the “smile zone” — when you smile, everyone else will notice it too. You want to have it repaired.

So, what will it be — a porcelain veneer or crown? Maybe neither: after examining it, your dentist may recommend another option you might even be able to undergo that very day — and walk out with a restored tooth.

This technique uses dental materials called composite resins.  These are blends of materials that can mimic the color and texture of tooth structure while also possessing the necessary strength to endure forces generated by biting and chewing. A good part of that strength comes from the way we’re able to bond the material to both the tooth’s outer enamel and underlying dentin, which together make up the main body of tooth structure. In skilled, artistic hands composite resins can be used effectively in a number of situations to restore a tooth to normal appearance.

While veneers or crowns also produce excellent results in this regard, they require a fair amount of tooth alteration to accommodate them. Your dentist will also need an outside dental laboratory to fabricate them, a procedure that could take several weeks. In contrast, a composite resin restoration usually requires much less tooth preparation and can be performed in the dental office in just one visit.

Composite resins won’t work in every situation — the better approach could in fact be a veneer or crown. But for slight chips or other minor defects, composite resin could transform your tooth’s appearance dramatically.

To see if composite resin is a viable restoration option for your tooth, visit your dentist for a complete dental examination. It’s quite possible you’ll leave with a more attractive tooth and a more confident smile.

If you would like more information on restorations using composite resins, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth with Composite Resin.”


AirAbrasionCouldbeaMorePleasantAlternativetotheDentalDrill

While it may not be one of your favorite features in the dental office, the dental drill is nevertheless necessary for treating problem teeth. It’s used primarily for removing decayed or damaged structure and preparing a tooth for fillings or other restorations.

Dental drills have been used for decades and are quite effective — but they have their drawbacks. Their rotating burrs often remove portions of healthy tooth structure along with decayed material. Friction from the drill action can cause discomfort, so local anesthesia is usually needed. Drills can also emit a high-pitched machine noise that’s unsettling to many patients.

There’s a growing alternative to the drill, known as air abrasion. Although the technology has been around since the 1950s, the development of new suction pumps that capture the resulting dust from its use has made it more palatable as an option to the traditional drill.

Also known as particle abrasion, the technique uses a pressurized stream of fine particles (usually aluminum oxide, an abrasive powder) directed at teeth to wear away (abrade) the tooth’s structural surface. We can be quite precise in the amount of surface material removed, so it’s useful for diminishing stains or roughing the surface for bonding materials like composite resin. We’re also able to remove decayed material with very little impact on surrounding healthy structure, and you may not need anesthesia during the procedure.

While this quiet alternative to the noisier drill is quite versatile, it does have its limitations. It’s not that efficient for preparing larger cavities for restoration or for removing older amalgam fillings. The teeth to be treated must be carefully isolated to prevent the fine particle dust produced from being swallowed by the patient or spread into the air. High-volume suction equipment is a must or the procedure will create a “sandstorm” of particles in the room.

Still, for situations suited to it and with proper isolation measures, air abrasion can be effective and comfortable. If the technology continues to improve, the dental drill may soon become a relic of the past.

If you would like more information on procedures using air abrasion, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Air Abrasion Technology.”